Journalism innovation and media startups


This team is examining how the development of journalism is being shaped by innovation practices, business models and policy frameworks. Current research includes a study of journalism startups in Canada in the past 20 years and an analysis of Google’s impact on journalism innovation globally.

The project includes the development of a critical race podcast at The Conversation Canada, exploring the mechanisms through which a journalism non-profit can leverage online media to enhance the production, distribution, and circulation of evidence-based reporting.  

Research team

Alfred Hermida Phd

Professor

School of Journalism, Writing, and Media, University of British Columbia

Mary Lynn Young Phd

Professor

School of Journalism, Writing, and Media, University of British Columbia

Vinita Srivastava

Director of Innovation

Senior Editor: Culture + Society, The Conversation Canada

Theme news

Scholars present  at ICA 2024

Scholars present at ICA 2024

74th Annual ICA Conference Gold Coast, Australia | 20-24 June 2024 …
Hanan Badr

Perspectives on challenges and innovations in journalism funding

Prominent media scholars advance future directions for journalism …
ICA post-conference attendees

New report on rethinking media funding, innovation and policy

Funding directions and innovation practices in journalism are the focus for a new report capturing the research and perspectives of …

Theme publications

Industry Partner Podcast

FLASHBACK: Indigenous land defenders on why they fight invasive development despite facing armed forces Don’t Call Me Resilient

In this episode of Don’t Call Me Resilient, we take a look at the ongoing struggle for land rights and some of the women on the front lines of that battle. These women are the land defenders fighting to protect land against invasive development. Both our guests have stood up to armed forces to protect land.Their work is about protecting the environment. But it is much more than that: it is fundamentally about survival and about the right to live openly on what is stolen land.Ellen Gabriel has been resisting land encroachment for 31 years. She was at the centre of the 1990 Kanehsatake resistance, (known as the Oka crisis), a 78-day standoff to protect ancestral Kanien’kéha:ka (Mohawk) land in Québec.It was a moment in history that many say helped wake them up to Indigenous issues.Anne Spice is a professor of geography and history at Toronto Metroppolitan University. Anne, who is Tlingit from Kwanlin Dun First Nation, was recently on the front lines in the defence of Wet'suwet'en land. After she was arrested on Wet'suwet'en territory last year, a viral video showed the RCMP pointing a gun at the land defenders.Anne can be heard shouting, we are unarmed and we are peaceful.These are the moments that capture our collective attention. But Ellen and Anne’s work goes well beyond what the cameras show.For more resources and information about this, go here: SHOW NOTESA full transcript of this episode can be found here: TRANSCRIPT
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